Thursday, November 24, 2011

Calling All Boomers: Don’t Start More Nonprofits - Opinion - The Chronicle of Philanthropy- Connecting the nonprofit world with news, jobs, and ideas

Calling All Boomers: Don’t Start More Nonprofits - Opinion - The Chronicle of Philanthropy- Connecting the nonprofit world with news, jobs, and ideas


Calling All Boomers: Don’t Start More Nonprofits

oldervolunteers

Many people probably rejoiced when they heard about a study released last week showing that 12 million baby boomers want to start their own nonprofit or socially oriented business over the next decade.

But it’s hard to imagine those findings cheered many people who understand the nonprofit world. More than a million nonprofit groups already exist, and plenty of for-profit ventures are dedicated in part to providing some social benefit. Adding millions more of such entities is not good for this nation...

What do you think?

Google Kills Off Seven More Products, Including Wave | LinkedIn


Google kills off seven more products including Wave
Sign outside of Google's headquarters
Google develops many products, not all of which are hits with the public

Google has announced that it is dropping seven more products in an effort to simplify its range of services.

The out-of-season "spring clean" brings an end to services including Google Wave, Knol and Google Gears.

It is the third time that the US firm has announced a cull of several of its products at the same time after they had failed to take off.



Wave goodbye

The seven latest products earmarked for the chop are as follows:

  • Google Wave - an attempt to combine email and instant messaging for real-time collaboration
  • Google Bookmarks List - a service which allowed users to share bookmarks with friends
  • Google Friends Connect - allowed webmasters to add social features to their sites by embedding a snippet of code
  • Google Gears - much-hyped effort to maintain web browser functionality when working offline
  • Google Search Timeline - a graph of historical query results
  • Knol - a Wikipedia-style project, which aimed to improve web content
  • Renewable Energy Cheaper than Coal - a project which aimed to find ways to improve solar power

Do you know the next products that you can wave Goodbye? Google Offers? Google Music? Google + ?


Wednesday, November 23, 2011

Andrew Mason, The Point, Online Collective Activism

Andrew Mason, The Point, Online Collective Activism

The Internet has a proven ability to shift the balance of power between individuals and organizations. But for online activism to reach its full potential, we need to do more than port offline tactics to the Web. We must step back, revisit the challenges of collective action, and consider what the Web offers that can help overcome them. Andrew Mason explores what the world could look like in five years with tools like The Point.


Watch Andrew Mason, The Point, Online Collective Activism in Tech & Spiele | View More Free Videos Online at Veoh.com

The Point Learn more....

Learn More | The Point

Easy and Effective Group Action.

Whether you're raising money, organizing people, or trying to influence change: if you can't do it alone, you can do it on The Point.


Starting Campaigns on The Point from Groupon, Inc on Vimeo.



Awesome!

Saturday, November 19, 2011

Robert Reich - 7 Lies about the ECONOMY

Robert Reich - 7 Lies - About the Economy



The President’s Jobs Bill doesn’t have a chance in Congress — and the Occupiers on Wall Street and elsewhere can’t become a national movement for a more equitable society – unless more Americans know the truth about the economy.

Here’s a short (2 minute 30 second) effort to rebut the seven biggest whoppers now being told by those who want to take America backwards. The major points:

1. Tax cuts for the rich trickle down to everyone else. Baloney. Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush both sliced taxes on the rich and what happened? Most Americans’ wages (measured by the real median wage) began flattening under Reagan and have dropped since George W. Bush. Trickle-down economics is a cruel joke.

2. Higher taxes on the rich would hurt the economy and slow job growth. False. From the end of World War II until 1981, the richest Americans faced a top marginal tax rate of 70 percent or above. Under Dwight Eisenhower it was 91 percent. Even after all deductions and credits, the top taxes on the very rich were far higher than they’ve been since. Yet the economy grew faster during those years than it has since. (Don’t believe small businesses would be hurt by a higher marginal tax; fewer than 2 percent of small business owners are in the highest tax bracket.)

3. Shrinking government generates more jobs. Wrong again. It means fewer government workers – everyone from teachers, fire fighters, police officers, and social workers at the state and local levels to safety inspectors and military personnel at the federal. And fewer government contractors, who would employ fewer private-sector workers. According to Moody’s economist Mark Zandi (a campaign advisor to John McCain), the $61 billion in spending cuts proposed by the House GOP will cost the economy 700,000 jobs this year and next.

4. Cutting the budget deficit now is more important than boosting the economy. Untrue. With so many Americans out of work, budget cuts now will shrink the economy. They’ll increase unemployment and reduce tax revenues. That will worsen the ratio of the debt to the total economy. The first priority must be getting jobs and growth back by boosting the economy. Only then, when jobs and growth are returning vigorously, should we turn to cutting the deficit.

5. Medicare and Medicaid are the major drivers of budget deficits. Wrong. Medicare and Medicaid spending is rising quickly, to be sure. But that’s because the nation’s health-care costs are rising so fast. One of the best ways of slowing these costs is to use Medicare and Medicaid’s bargaining power over drug companies and hospitals to reduce costs, and to move from a fee-for-service system to a fee-for-healthy outcomes system. And since Medicare has far lower administrative costs than private health insurers, we should make Medicare available to everyone.

6. Social Security is a Ponzi scheme. Don’t believe it. Social Security is solvent for the next 26 years. It could be solvent for the next century if we raised the ceiling on income subject to the Social Security payroll tax. That ceiling is now $106,800.

7. It’s unfair that lower-income Americans don’t pay income tax. Wrong. There’s nothing unfair about it. Lower-income Americans pay out a larger share of their paychecks in payroll taxes, sales taxes, user fees, and tolls than everyone else.

Demagogues through history have known that big lies, repeated often enough, start being believed — unless they’re rebutted. These seven economic whoppers are just plain wrong. Make sure you know the truth – and spread it on.

Friday, November 18, 2011

Mario Savio Memorial Lecture: Robert Reich on Class Warfare in America - YouTube

Mario Savio Memorial Lecture: Robert Reich on Class Warfare in America

I want you to listen to Robert Reich until the very END when he says THANK YOU!
This is the best speech on what is going on and what has got to CHANGE! The time for CHANGE has COME! Its time for JUSTICE!



More about and from Robert Reich

http://robertreich.org/

Robert Reich: Super Committee is Super Trouble - YouTube

Robert Reich: Super Committee is Super Trouble - YouTube

Robert Reich explains how the Super Committee could reduce the deficit by raising taxes on the 1% and create jobs, rather than making cuts that will hurt working families.

Wednesday, November 9, 2011

World Pneumonia Day 2011

World Pneumonia Day 2011 -

Do you know the facts on childhood pneumonia? The fight against this deadly disease can be won. Take a look at our video and learn how you can make a difference and save a life.

Saturday, November 5, 2011

Be THE CHANGE!


Greenhouse gases rise by record amount

Greenhouse gases rise by record amount

Levels of greenhouse gases are higher than the worst case scenario outlined by climate experts just four years ago 
  • guardian.co.uk
  • Warning on greenhouse gases failure
    Emissions from a coal-fired power station. The output of greenhouse gases has jumped by the highest amount on record. Photograph: John Giles/PA
    The global output of heat-trapping carbon dioxide has jumped by a record amount, according to the US department of energy, a sign of how feeble the world's efforts are at slowing man-made global warming.
    The figures for 2010 mean that levels of greenhouse gases are higher than the worst case scenario outlined by climate experts just four years ago.
    "The more we talk about the need to control emissions, the more they are growing," said John Reilly, the co-director of MIT's Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change.
    The world pumped about 564m more tons (512m metric tons) of carbon into the air in 2010 than it did in 2009, an increase of 6%. That amount of extra pollution eclipses the individual emissions of all but three countries, China, the US and India, the world's top producers of greenhouse gases.
    It is a "monster" increase that is unheard of, said Gregg Marland, a professor of geology at Appalachian State University, who has helped calculate department of energy figures in the past.
    Extra pollution in China and the US account for more than half the increase in emissions last year, Marland said.
    "It's a big jump," said Tom Boden, the director of the energy department's Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center at Oak Ridge National Lab. "From an emissions standpoint, the global financial crisis seems to be over."
    Boden said that in 2010 people were travelling, and manufacturing was back up worldwide, spurring the use of fossil fuels, the chief contributor of man-made climate change.
    India and China are huge users of coal. Burning coal is the biggest carbon source worldwide and emissions from that jumped nearly 8% in 2010.
    "The good news is that these economies are growing rapidly so everyone ought to be for that, right?" Reilly said. "Broader economic improvements in poor countries has been bringing living improvements to people. Doing it with increasing reliance on coal is imperiling the world."
    In 2007, when the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change issued its last large report on global warming, it used different scenarios for carbon dioxide pollution and said the rate of warming would be based on the rate of pollution. Boden said the latest figures put global emissions higher than the worst case projections from the climate panel. Those forecast global temperatures rising between 4 and 11 degrees Fahrenheit (2.4-6.4 Celsius) by the end of the century with the best estimate at 7.5 degrees (4 Celsius).
    Even though global warming sceptics have criticised the climate change panel as being too alarmist, scientists have generally found their predictions too conservative, Reilly said. He said his university worked on emissions scenarios, their likelihood, and what would happen. The IPCC's worst case scenario was only about in the middle of what MIT calculated are likely scenarios.
    Chris Field of Stanford University, head of one of the IPCC's working groups, said the panel's emissions scenarios are intended to be more accurate in the long term and are less so in earlier years. He said the question now among scientists is whether the future is the panel's worst case scenario "or something more extreme".
    "Really dismaying," Granger Morgan, head of the engineering and public policy department at Carnegie Mellon University, said of the new figures. "We are building up a horrible legacy for our children and grandchildren."
    But Reilly and University of Victoria climate scientist Andrew Weaver found something good in recent emissions figures. The developed countries that ratified the 1997 Kyoto Protocol greenhouse gas limiting treaty have reduced their emissions overall since then and have achieved their goals of cutting emissions to about 8% below 1990 levels. The US did not ratify the agreement.
    In 1990, developed countries produced about 60% of the world's greenhouse gases, now it's probably less than 50%, Reilly said.
    "We really need to get the developing world because if we don't, the problem is going to be running away from us," Weaver said. "And the problem is pretty close from running away from us."

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